ReadMe file included with the screen saver
This file may contain minor modifications/revisions.
(CIA v1.0 build 00H03)

Click here to return to the Screen Saver page.

CURRIER & IVES' AMERICANA SCREEN SAVER v1.0
Copyright 2000 www.BeauxArtsUSA.com
E-mail: Currier&Ives@BeauxArtsUSA.com
 

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

To install, locate the file "Currier & Ives" (in some versions the file name may be "Setup" or "CIAxxxxxxx") using the Windows Explorer, then double click on the file (It will run automatically.). Alternatively, run the file "Currier & Ives.exe" using the RUN command from the START menu. The screen saver installs and asks if you want to use it as your default screen saver.

SCREEN SAVER CONFIGURATION & REGISTRATION

Certain features are configurable under the Screen Saver window. The duration each image is presented can be changed (default: 10 seconds), the image size can be changed from full screen to actual size, and the captions and transition effects can be turned "off."

The screen saver configuration menu is also used to register this product (i.e., for entering the user name and key code). A ReadMe file, which provides original captions from the prints, can be accessed from the configuration menu.
 
After installation, a screen saver icon appears in the 
Windows system tray. Double click on the icon to 
start the screen saver or right click to access the 
configuration menu and other options . . .

or access the configuration menu by Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> Display -> Screen Saver -> Settings

REGISTRATION is completed by simply entering the user name and key code for this product in the boxes found in the "Settings" window. This information must be entered exactly as found in the registration confirmation. After the information is correctly entered, the "Trial" tab disappears and the "Settings" window closes.

IMPORTANT NOTE

The "Currier & Ives' Americana" screen saver is copyright 2000 Beaux Arts Antiques & Armour. BeauxArtsUSA and www.BeauxArtsUSA.com are trade marks of Beaux Arts Antiques & Armour. Windows 95/98/NT/2000 are trade marks of Microsoft Corporation.

No warranty or liability for the use of this screen saver is expressed or implied. The screen saver has been tested thoroughly on various computers using the Windows operating systems, but the manufacturer will not be held responsible for any possible problems resulting from the use of this product.

Registered users are licensed to use this program on multiple computers in a single family residence AND on a single computer in a business environment. Commercial users should register one copy per installation or inquire about a
site license. In no case should a single registration be shared by more than five computers. Send comments and inquiries to Currier&Ives@BeauxArtsUSA.com.

PRODUCTION NOTE

The original lithographs made by N. Currier and by Currier and Ives were printed from stone plates and hand colored. Unlike steel engravings, this process does not produce uniformly sharp prints with high definition. Furthermore, the original prints produced by these lithographers are now well over 100 years old, often showing considerable signs of age. These factors make the images in this screen saver somewhat "soft" and many of the colors muted. Although is it somewhat tempting to digitally enhance these images, digital manipulation has been kept to a minimum (slight color enhancement and image sharpening was used on some images) in order to preserve the character of the original lithographs. Similarly, the format of the original prints is not in correct proportion for computer monitors (i.e., not 1:1.33); this poses the problem of how to best present the images while producing a "pleasant" appearing screen image. Again, in order to change the original images as little as possible, minimal cropping was used and blank space was allowed to fill the area around the 'disproportioned' images. Finally, the images were recorded using a larger than normal digital format. Even with cropping out the mattes and occasionally small parts of the actual image, most of the final images are around 800 pixels wide. This makes the screen saver file considerably larger than normal, but it creates minimal distortion when viewed at 600 x 800 pixels and larger screen sizes.

Because this is simply a screen saver and not intended to be a scholarly work (well-written books on Currier & Ives abound), only the original print captions are included in this documentation -- this material is reproduced without editing or commentary (As seen below, some prints had extensive captions while others were only titled.). Information about folio size, artists, the print-making process, and etc. can be obtained by consulting one of the numerous scholarly works on Currier & Ives. The purpose of this screen saver is simply to provide a few "digital samples" of Currier & Ives' vast work for the collectors, traders, and admirers of their 'classic Americana' prints.

SCREEN SAVER CONTENTS

Currier and Ives are probably American's best known 19th Century print makers. They depicted life in everyday America from the mid to late 19th Century, and today their work provides a visual record of that era. Before the emergence of America as a super-power, domestic issues and everyday life dominated the psyche of most Americans. Currier and Ives documented this contemporary America -- from the Westward expansion to life on the Mississippi, from hunting and farming to life in the city, and from famous people (and famous horses) to historically important events (e.g., the American Civil War). This volume of Currier and Ives' Americana contains a selection of images mostly from the mid-19th Century, including some of their most famous lithographs.

NOTE: The captions contained on the original prints are included here, without correction or note of spelling and grammatical errors. The publication year and whether published by N. Currier or by Currier and Ives is indicated for each print. The print title is given in upper case letters followed on the next line by the subtitle (in title case) when included. Information following the dash (actually, a double hyphen in this text file) is the commentary or other information included with the original print. Any brief editorial notes are given in brackets.

THE FALL OF RICHMOND VA. ON THE NIGHT OF APRIL 2nd, 1865 (Currier & Ives, 1865)
-- This strong hold and Capital City of the Davis Confederacy, was evacuated by the Rebels in consequence of the defeat at "Five Forks" of the Army of Northern Virginia under Lee, and capture of the South side Rail Road, by the brave heroes of the North, commanded by Generals Grant, Sheridan, and others. Before abandoning the City the Rebels set fire to it, destroying a vast amount of property; and the conflagration continued until it was subdued by the Union troops in the following morning.

CENTRAL-PARK, WINTER (Currier & Ives, 1862)
The Skating Pond.

"WOODING UP" ON THE MISSISSIPPI (Currier & Ives, 1863)

ACROSS THE CONTINENT (Currier & Ives, 1868)
"Westward the Course of the Empire Takes Its Way."

THE LAST WAR-WHOOP (N. Currier, 1856)

AMERICAN FOREST SCENE -- MAPLE SUGARING (N. Currier, 1856)

LIFE ON THE PRAIRIE -- THE BUFFALO HUNT (Currier & Ives, 1862)

A COTTON PLANTATION ON THE MISSISSIPPI (Currier & Ives, 1884)

THE HOME OF THE DEER (Currier & Ives, 1862)
Morning in the Adirondacks.

AMERICAN RAILROAD SCENE -- SNOW BOUND (Currier & Ives, 1871)

CLIPPER SHIP "RED JACKET" (N. Currier, 1855)
in the Ice Off Cape Horn on Her Passage from Australia, to Liverpool, August 1854. -- Built by Geo. Thomas Esq. at Rockland, Me 1853, for Mess. Seacomb & Taylor, Boston, Mass.

James Hammill, and Walter Brown, in their GREAT FIVE MILE ROWING MATCH FOR $4000 & THE CHAMPIONSHIP OF AMERICA (Currier & Ives, 1867)
at Newburg Bay, Hudson River, N.Y. Sept. 9th, 1867. -- Won by Hammill, on a claim of "foul" allowed by the referee Stephen Roberts, Esq. Time, 41 minutes 56 seconds. Hammill's boat, the Frank Smith, built by James McKay, of Harlem, N.Y., 31 ft. 6 inch long, 12 inch wide., 6 inch deep, weight 35 lbs. Brown's boat, the G. P. Butler, built by Ellicott, of Greenpoint, L.I., 34 feet long, 11 1/2 inch wide, 6 inches deep, weight 35 lbs. [Ed. note: Walter Brown is on the left and James Hammill is on the right of the print.]

THE ROAD, WINTER (N. Currier, 1853)

THE LIFE OF A FIREMAN -- THE METROPOLITAN SYSTEM (Currier & Ives, 1866)

AN AMERICAN RAILWAY SCENE, AT HORNELLSVILLE, ERIE RAILWAY (Currier & Ives, 1874)
The Great Trunk Line and United States mail route between New York City and the Western States and territories, renowned for its beautiful scenery, its substantial road bed, double tracked with steel rail, and its well appointed passenger trains, equipped with the celebrated Pullman Hotel, drawing room and sleeping coaches.

THE ROUTE TO CALIFORNIA (Currier & Ives, 1871)*
Truckee River Sierra-Nevada.

THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS (Currier & Ives, 1866)*
Emigrants Crossing the Plains.

THE HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN (Currier & Ives, 1862)*
Republican Candidate for Sixteenth President of the United States.

BOMBARDMENT AND CAPTURE OF ISLAND "NUMBER TEN" (Currier & Ives, 1862)*
on the Mississippi River, April 7th, 1862, by the Gunboat and Mortar Fleet under Command of Com. A.H. Foote. -- Commodore Foote with his Flotilla, left Cairo by order of Gen. Halleck, on the 14th of March, and arrived at his anchorage above Island "Number Ten" on the afternoon of the following day, and immediately opened fire on the Fort, which was continued day and night until April 7th when at midnight the Rebels surrendered; and the whole Island with all its vast munitions of war fell into our hands, after having withstood a bombardment of twenty three days.

THE CELEBRATED HORSE LEXINGTON (5 YRS. OLD) BY "BOSTON" OUT OF "ALICE CARNEAL" (N Currier, 1855)*
Bred by Dr. Warfield, Owned by R. Ten Broeck, Esq. -- Winner of the Great 4 Mile Match for $20,000 against "LeCompte's" time 7:26 over the Metairie Course. New Orleans, April 2nd, 1855. Won in 7:19 3/4!!!

"TROTTING CRACKS" AT HOME (Currier & Ives, 1868)*
A Model Stable.
[Ed. note: "Peerless," left center; "Dexter," mid center; "The Auburn Horse," left center.]

WOMANS HOLY WAR (Currier & Ives, 1874)*
Grand Charge on the Enemy's Works.

THE PORT OF NEW YORK (Currier & Ives, 1878)*
Birds Eye View from the Battery, Looking South.

NEW YORK CRYSTAL PALACE (N. Currier, 1853)*
for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations. -- These buildings constructed of iron and glass, are erected on Reservoir Square in the City of New York. The ground plan of the main building, forms an octagon, and is surmounted by a Greek cross, with a dome over the intersection. Dimensions, Main Building: extreme length 865 feet, extreme breadth 365 feet, height of dome to top of lantern 146 feet, entire space on ground floor 111,000 square feet, galleries 62,000 square feet. Dimensions, Additional Buildings: extreme length 451 feet, space on ground floor 22,872 square feet, space on gallery 9,480 square feet, whole area of buildings 5 acres or 205,352 square feet. Geo. J.B. Carstensen & Charles Gildemeister, architects.

THE CATTSKILL MOUNTAINS (Currier & Ives, 1860)*
from the Eastern Shore of the Hudson.

STATEN ISLAND AND THE NARROWS (Currier & Ives, 1861)*
from Fort Hamilton.
[Ed. note: Fort Richmond across the water on the left, Fort Lafayette middle island, Fort Hamilton on the right edge.]

PEYTONA AND FASHION, IN THEIR GREAT MATCH FOR $20,000 (N. Currier, 1845)*
Over the Union Course L.I. May 13th, 1845, Won by Peytona. Time 7:39 3/4, 7:45 1/4. Peytona, red chestnut; rider, blue jacket, black cap. Fashion, light chestnut; rider, purple jacket, green cap.

CAMPING IN THE WOODS (Currier & Ives, 1863)*
"A Good Time Coming."

AMERICAN HUNTING SCENES -- AN EARLY START (Currier & Ives, 1863)*

BROOK TROUT FISHING (Currier & Ives, 1862)*
"An Anxious Moment."

THE GREAT RACE ON THE MISSISSIPPI (Currier & Ives, 1870)*
from New Orleans to St. Louis 1210 Miles. -- Between the steamers Robt. E. Lee, Capt. J.W. Cannon and Natchez, Capt. T.P. Leathers. Won by the R.E. Lee, time: 3 days 18 hours 30 minutes. The boats left the Wharf at New Orleans June 30th, 1870, at 4:55 P.M. The Lee reached the Wharf Boat at St. Louis July 4th, at 11:25 A.M. Time to Baton Rouge, 8 hours 25 minutes; Time to Natchez, 17 hours 11 minutes; Time to Vicksburg, 1 day 0 hours 38 minutes; Time to Memphis, 2 days 6 hours 9 minutes; Time to Cairo, 3 days 1 hour 0 minutes; Time to St. Louis 3 days 18 hours 30 minutes. The Natchez reached the Wharf Boat at St. Louis July 4th, at 5:58 P.M., six hours and thirty-three minutes behind the Lee, having been detained six hours by fog at Devils' Island. The best previous time on the river between New Orleans and St. Louis was 3 days 21 hours and 58 minutes, made by the Natchez, June, 1870.

"ROUNDING A BEND" ON THE MISSISSIPPI (Currier & Ives, 1866)*
The Parting salute.

LIFE ON THE PRAIRIE -- THE TRAPPERS DEFENSE "FIRE FIGHT FIRE" (Currier & Ives, 1862)*

ARGUING THE POINT (N. Currier, 1855)*

AUTUMN IN NEW ENGLAND -- CIDER MAKING (Currier & Ives, 1866)*

WINTER IN THE COUNTRY -- A COLD MORNING (Currier & Ives, 1864)*

THE LIFE OF A FIREMAN -- THE NEW ERA (Currier & Ives, 1861)*
Steam and Muscle.

    [* seen after registration]
 

REGISTRATION

This screen saver is shareware not freeware. If you enjoy the program, please
register. Registered users can receive free version upgrades of this volume
and notification when other volumes are released. A key code is provided after
registration that eliminates the "nag" screen and "unlocks" additional images.
 
 

You can register online using a credit card through PayPal. Go to www.BeauxArtsUSA.com/ScreenSavers.htm and follow the instructions. Be sure to include your name used for the registration and select the screen saver you are ordering from the hyperlinks. Your key code will be sent by return e-mail to the address used for sending the registration fee.

 
For a limited time, the diskette and CD-ROM versions are available to registered users for a $3.00 shipping and handling fee. This offer may be terminated at any time without advanced notice.


OAUA member status Copyright 2000 Beaux Arts Antiques & Armour
Report technical problems to: webmaster@BeauxArtsUSA.com